Tuesday, 16 April 2013

They Are My People

When we landed in Vancouver, our good friends met us at the airport to take us to their place where we were staying for the next few days.  As we didn't yet have a carseat for LB, we had to travel a very short distance via Skytrain and a bus to get to their condo.

I was wearing LB in the ergo carrier (Babies! The latest fashion craze! While sporting your baby just remember the golden rule: the more organic looking you are the more in style you'll be!) and when we got on the bus there were no available seats so we were standing. As Alexi and I were gossipping away, a man stood up from his seat and approached me. Then he did something insane. Something you only hear about in urban legends. He...offered me his seat.

I actually was at a loss for words I was so surprised and confused by the gesture.

"Ah...oh....um...really?...THANK-YOU."

I have only ever been offered a seat once while here in Switzerland, and that was obviously when I was pregnant. I can assure you, Internet, that there was a lot more than one time when I was heavily pregnant that I climbed on the bus, found no seats available, and then had to stand for the duration of the bus ride while the seated passengers around me tried to avoid eye-contact so they could avoid feeling the resulting shame of knowing they were sitting down while I was standing.

Once a teen even aggressively pushed their way in front of me in order to get the last available seat.

I was seven months pregnant.

So...yeah. Passenger courtesy doesn't happen too often around here.

And if you live in Switzerland, are reading this and thinking "I give up my seat all the time" or "people always give up their seats on MY bus" then I want to live on your bus route, because hardly anyone does on mine. After everyone has strategically tried to position themselves to be first on the bus (side note: people were lining-up for the bus in Vancouver. I was really confused!), then comically shoved themselves through the bus doors, it's a mad scramble to get a seat and even the elderly are often left to fend for themselves if they aren't fast enough.

So as you can see, it was a great shock to me that this man offered me his seat. I wasn't even pregnant. Just had the baby on my person. But once I got over my shock I felt all warm and fuzzy inside: These are my people! They really are so nice! I love you all!

And in case you're wondering: Duh, of course I offer up my seat on the bus.

I'm Canadian.

 

1 comment:

Ais said...

Yay Canada! :)